'Each piece in this bed of ambition,' stated the late American painter Stanley Boxer, 'has its own "particularness". Each piece is unto itself.'

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Douglas Bentham has maintained an international reputation as a major practitioner of abstract, constructivist sculpture for over forty years. ‘He is one of the country’s most prolific sculptors,’ writes art critic Terry Fenton, ‘one of its finest, one of Canada’s first sculptors in every sense.’

Bentham graduated with a BA Advanced degree in painting from the University of Saskatchewan in 1969. He received an MFA in sculpture from that institution in 1989, working alongside eminent artists/teachers Eli Bornstein and Otto Rogers. He has contributed to many international artists’ workshops throughout his career, including the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshop, Saskatchewan, Canada; the Triangle Artists’ Workshop, New York, US; and the Hardingham Sculpture Workshop, Norfolk, UK. He has presented over fifty solo exhibitions across Canada, notably a nationally travelling exhibition organized by the Art Gallery of York University, Toronto, ON, in 1975, and a ten-year survey exhibition at the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, SK, in 1980. The Mendel Art Gallery, in his home city of Saskatoon, presented a major exhibition of his work in 2005. A series of six large-scale works executed in Norfolk, UK, in 1990, and subsequently shown at the A.P.T Gallery, London, UK, in 2007, will tour public galleries in the artist’s home province in 2012. Portal, 2007, a recent acquisition by the Art Gallery of Hamilton, has since been installed in the new Irving Zucker Sculpture Court.

Bentham’s commissioned works grace many outdoor settings across the nation, notably a signature stainless steel sculpture, Unfurled, 2006, in Saskatoon, SK, and the recent installation of the painted steel sculpture Garland, 2008, on the campus of the University of Western Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON.  Douglas Bentham has received numerous honours and awards, most notably membership in the Royal Canadian Academy in 1976 and the recipient of the Lynch-Staunton Award from the Canada Council in 1981.

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